Junya Ishigami – Freeing Architecture

“Just imagine how many more kinds of architecture there could be. […] Imagine every day, a world that will never be complete, and you can spend your life dreaming.”
Junya Ishigami, Freeing Architecture, LIXIL Publishing, Tokyo, 2018

 

Think of architecture as something intangible, a halo rather than a physical object, an experience every time different, a series of unique cases interacting with each other in as many ways as possible.
Now think of architecture as something independent, standing by itself, taking reference by anything.
The work of Junya Ishigami wants to push this boundary further. Stones become pillars, animals become buildings, or more, clouds become meditative spaces. There is no limit to imagination. Architecture and nature coalesce into one single element.

Ishigami is a contemporary Japanese architect, born in 1974 in Kanagawa prefecture, Japan, and he acquired his master’s degree in architecture and planning at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music in 2000.
After graduation he had the opportunity to work for Kazuyo Sejima and Ritsue Nishizawa for 4 years and the influence he received in these years will clearly remain in all his personal works after this period.
He absorbed the audacious and innovative way of thinking of SANAA, thinking of space as a fluid unstable element. The purpose of a building is not just to respond to a specific program, but more precisely to respond to a specific program in a specific place in a specific time, leaving the door open to change, embracing naturally time in the story of evolution.

The role of the architect in the 21st century is that to choose a place and to preserve it as much as he can. The architect needs just to set the basis, to realize the prototype that allows architecture to adapt to multiple futures.

This is the exhibition “Junya Ishigami – Freeing Architecture” at the Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain in Paris from March 30 to June 10, 2018.

“Freeing architecture means listening carefully to, observing, what is already in this world, and becoming knowledgable about many things.
Engaging with what is in front of us.
The flexibility to discard fixed ideas and accept what is there, for what it is.
Becoming liberated from our personal values. […]
Architecture for an age of free access to information.
Architecture for an age of free connections.
Architecture for an age of freedom in values.”

House/Restaurant, Yamaguchi, Honshu, Japan  – 2013
Photo: Marco Morra
House/Restaurant, Yamaguchi, Honshu, Japan  – 2013
Photo: Marco Morra
Cloud Arch, Sydney, Australia – 2015
Photo: Marco Morra
Forest Kindergarten, Shandong, Chine – 2015
Photo: Marco Morra
Botanical Farm Garden Art Biotop/Restaurant, Tochigi, Japan – 2016
Photo: Marco Morra
Chapel of Valley, Rhizao, Chine – 2016
Photo: Marco Morra
Vijversburg Visitor Center, Tytsjerk, The Netherlands – 2012-2017
Photo: Marco Morra
Eight Villas, Dali, China – 2016
Photo: Marco Morra
Chapel of Valley, Rhizao, Chine – 2016
Photo: Marco Morra
University Multipurpose Plaza, Kanagawa, Japan – 2008
Photo: Marco Morra
Home for the Elderly, Tohuku, Japan – 2012
Photo: Marco Morra
University Multipurpose Plaza, Kanagawa, Japan – 2008
Photo: Marco Morra
View on the spaces of the exhibition in Fondation Cartier, Ground Floor
Photo: Marco Morra

All images © 2018 Marco Morra

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